Posts by Lauren Williams

The Sensory Child Gets Organized by Carolyn Dalgliesh

I’m unhappy that I didn’t post this review in August 2015, when I first stumbled on the book in a thrift shop. The review only went up on Amazon, grrrrr. Better late than never? It offers techniques for helping children with Sensory Processing Disorder stay organized. Someone in my family has Sensory Processing Disorder, which…

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How to organize just about everything by Peter Walsh

I love Peter Walsh and I loved Clean Sweep, but…. How to organize just about everything: More Than 500 Step-by-Step Instructions for Everything from Organizing Your Closets to Planning a Wedding to Creating a Flawless Filing System is not as useful as I’d hoped.  Great on some basics: “how to organize a school locker” was…

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An Oasis in Time by Marilyn Paul, Ph.D.

An Oasis in Time: How a Day of Rest can Save Your Life, like It’s Hard to Make a Difference When You Can’t Find Your Keys is a gentle, good-natured look at human tendencies. But the books couldn’t otherwise be more different. It’s Hard focuses on STUFF, anything from the paperwork for paying the bills to…

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The Organizer on the Road Show

I’ll be presenting The Organizer on the Road Show Wednesday March 13, 2019 at Kenmore Senior Center 6910 NE 170th Street Kenmore, WA 98028 425-489-0707   1:00PM – 2:00PM   Road Trip! The Organizer on the Road Show I have a portable demonstration of an organizing session, to let anyone get familiar and comfortable with…

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At least we can consume for a cause

Ugh, it’s the holiday season. The time of year when somehow the only thing that expresses love is a shiny rock, or something that needs batteries, or something that you’ll regret buying within two days. Doesn’t have to be quite so all-consuming consumerist. The following companies let you indulge in bling and contribute to a…

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Pollyanna – the ACTUAL book

The original Pollyanna,  written by Eleanor H. Porter, published by L.C. Page and Company, 53 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 1913, eventually spewed 15 sequels. I’ve referred to it myself in prior posts, using the now-ubiquitous, sometimes sneered, definition of “a person characterized by irrepressible optimism and a tendency to find good in everything (Merriam-Webster still…

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